In order to qualify for a line-of-duty disability pension, a police officer in Illinois must be disabled as the result of an injury resulting from an “act of duty” as defined by the Pension Code. The mere fact that an officer is on duty at the time he or she is injured is not enough

Can you have your wage differential and your perm total, too? In the case of Chlada v. Ill. Workers’ Comp. Comm’n, 58 N.E.3d 848, 405 Ill.Dec. 587 (Ill. App. 2016) , the answer from the Appellate Court was a resounding YES. In this case, the petitioner was employed as a beer truck driver / salesman.

If there is a third party case associated with your workers’ compensation claim, you need to be careful about what body parts you list in that contract at the time of settlement! The third district of the Illinois Appellate Court recently decided the case of Clifton Armstead v. National Freight, 2020 IL App (3d) 170777

American Coal Company v. The Illinois Workers’ Compensation Commission was published on November 16, 2020 by the Appellate Court’s Workers’ Compensation Division. The claimant, Robert Deere, filed a claim for benefits under the Workers’ Occupational Disease Act against his employer, American Coal Company, for injuries to his lungs, heart, pulmonary system, and respiratory tracts allegedly

Never a dull moment. Recently, in the case of Marquita McDonald v. Symphony Bronzeville, LLC et. al., the Illinois Appellate Court was called upon to determine whether the exclusivity provisions of the Illinois Workers’ Compensation Act bar a claim for statutory damages under the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act where an employer is alleged

On October 16, 2020, the 2nd District of the Illinois Appellate Court issued its decision in the case of West Bend Mutual Insurance Company v. TRRS Corporation, et. al. The decision addressed a consolidated interlocutory appeal concerning the propriety of a circuit court’s order staying the proceedings on a claim filed before the Illinois Workers’

I like reading Rule 23 orders. In Illinois, Rule 23 orders are decisions by the Appellate Court that can’t be used as precedent except in very limited circumstances. They often fall within two categories. The first category consists of scenarios that happen so often, it would be silly to publish all of them. It’s the